Required Cargo Treatments for USA exports to Australia and New Zealand

Please be advised regarding the following guidelines and treatment requirements for cargo traveling from ports in the U.S. to Australia and New Zealand during the 2016/2017 active season for Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs.

As per the Department of Agriculture website, stink bug season runs from September 1 2016 to April 30 2017.  FCL shipments shipped within these dates will require mandatory treatment, except goods manufactured after December 1 which will require a manufacturers declaration.

Below is the list of the full requirements:

Break bulk

  • From 1 September 2016, all used goods in the target tariffs shipped as break bulk must be treated for potential stink bug infestations prior to shipment on or before 30 April 2017.
  • New goods in the target tariffs manufactured and/or stored between
    1 September 2016 and 1 December 2016 and shipped as break bulk on or before 30 April 2017 must undergo offshore treatment, unless subject to safeguarding arrangements approved by the department.
  • New goods in the target tariffs manufactured on or after 1 December 2016 and shipped as break bulk on or before 30 April 2017 require a consignment specific manufacturer’s new and used and not field tested (NUFT) declaration which includes the date and place of manufacture.
  • Goods that arrive untreated must be treated onshore on wharf or at an Approved Arrangement Site 1.1 if safe to move. Treatment must occur within 48 hours of discharge at the wharf of arrival. If this cannot be arranged, the goods will not be permitted discharge but may be shipped to another port where treatment facilities are available or may be exported.

Containerised

  • FCL/ FCX containerised goods in the target tariffs are subject to the same requirements as break bulk
    • for used goods shipped between 1 September 2016 and 30 April 2017
    • for new goods manufactured and/or stored between 1 September 2016 and 1 December 2016 
    • for new goods manufactured on or after 1 December 2016.
  • LCL containerised goods will not be targeted under these measures.
  • FCL/FCX containerised goods that arrive untreated will require mandatory treatment onshore. Containers will be permitted discharge to the wharf if the seals are intact, and moved to either an Approved Arrangement Site 1.1 or 1.3 (if fumigation facilities are available) for treatment.

Goods manufactured after 1 December

New goods in the target tariffs manufactured on or after 1 December 2016 and shipped on or before 30 April 2017 do not require offshore treatment if they have a consignment specific manufacturer’s new and used and not field tested (NUFT) declaration which includes the date and place of manufacture. A good is only considered to be manufactured after 1 December if all its large, complex components have also been manufactured after 1 December.

Target goods

New and used vehicles, vessels and machinery continue to be the primary target goods, with some changes. However, the targeted goods have been revised to ensure more of the large, complex goods that can harbour BMSB infestations are targeted, while lower risk goods are exempted. Some changes are a direct response to information derived from the 2015-16 response, while others are enabled by new systems functionality.

The 2016-17 target goods have been changed to:

  • include break bulk machinery parts
  • include machinery from additional tariffs
  • exclude lower risk goods such as small all-terrain vehicles, jet skis, canoes and buoys.

Heightened Surveillance

While the measures apply to target goods from the US, the department will be conducting heightened surveillance on exempt goods from the US and other countries in the northern hemisphere during the risk season. If pest infestations are detected through this surveillance, the department may expand the measures to other goods and/or pathways as required.

Treatments

The treatment conditions are:

  • Sulfuryl fluoride – at least 48g/m3 for 6 hours or longer or at least 16g/m3 for 12 hours or longer both with an end point reading of 50% or more of the initial concentration and conducted at a temperature of 10 °C or higher. Please note this temperature is 5 °C lower than the methyl bromide conditions below.
  • Methyl bromide – at least 16g/m3 for 12 hours or longer with an end point reading of 50% or more of the initial concentration and conducted at a temperature of 15 °C or higher. Please note this temperature is 5 °C higher than the sulfuryl fluoride conditions above.
  • Heat – at 50 °C or greater for at least 20 minutes in the coldest location in the vehicle.

Treatment time before loading

  • Break bulk goods treated before 1 December 2016 must undergo treatment within 96 hours of loading.
  • Break bulk goods treated on or after 1 December 2016 are unlikely to become re-infested, so are not subject to a treatment window.
  • Containerised goods sealed after treatment and arriving seals intact are not subject to a treatment window.

Segregation of treated and untreated goods

It is advisable to keep treated and untreated break bulk goods physically segregated both on wharf prior to loading and on vessel. This will help avoid the risk of cross-contamination.

Treatment certificates

Treatment certificates must:

  • identify the cargo treated and include a unique identifiable link to the consignment
  • specify the date of BMSB treatment, the type of treatment, and the timeframe
  • include a plastic wrap declaration.

The department’s documentary requirements policy is outlined in the departmental website, where acceptable document templates can also be found.

Bills of lading

Bills of lading must include the shipped on board date. The department uses the shipped on board date on the bill of lading as the date shipped from the US, thus determining whether target goods are subject to the seasonal measures.

Submission of documentation

If the required documents are not submitted in time or are incomplete, the goods will be regarded as untreated and directed for treatment onshore. Break bulk goods that cannot be verified as treated within 48 hours of discharge may be directed for export. It is therefore recommended that documents be lodged correctly, and at least 48 hours prior to vessel arrival. 

Alternative arrangements—safeguarding

Safeguarding is a detailed pest risk management plan/system that can be implemented by manufacturers offshore in consultation with the department as an alternative to the mandatory pre-shipment treatment requirements.  Safeguarding arrangements will need to be approved by the department prior to departure of the goods for Australia.  Information on safeguarding eligibility and requirements is available on the department’s website.

Charging

All charges for the department’s services in documentary processing, risk assessments and inspections will be directed to the owner/importer of the goods automatically, using existing entry management processes for all imported goods. This will be revised only if a new infestation of viable stink bugs is detected on board a vessel prior to goods discharge to the wharf.

The department will not be charging for the assessment of applications for safeguarding arrangements, as these arrangements are still being trialed.